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Darkeforce
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« Reply #810 on: June 22, 2008, 21:19:21 EDT »

This is really messed up.

http://www.courthousenews.com/2008/06/16/Eighth_Grader_Says_Teacher_Burned_A_Cross_Into_His_Flesh.htm

Quote
Eighth Grader Says Teacher Burned A Cross Into His Flesh

     COLUMBUS, OHIO (CN) - An eighth-grade science teacher culminated a religious crusade in his classroom by burning a cross into a student's flesh, and the school principal responded to parents' complaints by writing the teacher a letter, but promised not to put it in the teacher's personnel file unless he did it again, the parents claim in Federal Court.
     On behalf of their son, the John Does parents sued eighth-grade teacher John Freshwater, the Mount Vernon City School District, its Superintendent Stephen Short, and Mount Vernon Middle School Principal William White.
     The John Does claim Freshwater has unconstitutionally taught his religious beliefs in his science classes for more than a decade. They claim that in 2003 Freshwater sought, and was denied permission, to teach "intelligent design," but does it anyway. They claim his classroom is festooned with Biblical posters, that he tells his students that "although he is forced to teach from the textbooks, the teachings are wrong or not proven according to the Bible."
     The complaint states: "On Dec. 6, 2007, Mr. Freshwater burned a cross into James Doe's arm using an electric device manufactured by Electro-Technic Products, Inc., Model BD-10A. The manufacturer of Model BD-10A warns that the electric device has a high voltage output that should never be used to touch human skin. ... Mr. Freshwater applied the electric device to the arm of at least one other eighth grade student on Dec. 6, 2007. The area burned with Model BD-10A resulted in an easily identifiable cross consisting of red welts with blistering, swelling and blanching in the surrounding area.
     "On Dec. 7, 2007, John and Jane Doe notified Defendant Superintendent Short regarding Mr. Freshwater's inappropriate activity in his eighth grade science class. Mr. Freshwater was not disciplined for his actions of Dec. 6, 2007 with regard to the misuse of Model BD-10A. Defendant Principal William D. White wrote a letter to Mr. Freshwater in January 2008, stating that Mr. Freshwater was not to shock children with the device. Defendant Principal White's letter noted that it would not be placed in Mr. Freshwater's personnel file unless he shocked his students again."
     The complaint also states that Freshwater, as adviser of the school's Fellowship of Christian Athletes, claimed to drive Satan out of a speaker at a club meeting, told club members that "they are saved, whereas the other students playing on the playground are going to Hell," distributed Bibles at school, gave "extra credit" to students who did work on "intelligent design," and that school administrators knew all this but failed to discipline him for it.
     They also claim that after they complained about Freshwater's constitutional violations, the superintendent promised he would not reveal the Does' name to Freshwater, but he did reveal it to him.
     Plaintiffs demand punitive damages for constitutional damages and retaliation. They are represented by Jessica Philemond.

Wanker. When the bible says "Suffer the little children...", it doesn't mean to actually make them suffer.
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« Reply #811 on: June 23, 2008, 03:11:50 EDT »

Someone obviously spent a lot of time reading the Bible... and still managed to forget everything it said.
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« Reply #812 on: June 23, 2008, 20:23:22 EDT »

That guy should really be in jail, for aggravated assault on a minor ×2
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« Reply #813 on: July 03, 2008, 00:37:34 EDT »


Quote
Jul 2, 4:12 PM EDT

New Zealand man puts up his soul for auction

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- A New Zealand man has put his soul up for auction to the highest bidder, noting that it is "a merry old soul" rather than a "funk soul brother" but that he would "would like to think there is a bit of funk in there somewhere."

Walter Scott, 24, put his soul up for sale on New Zealand Internet auction site TradeMe, and so far has received more than 100 expressions of interest.

Bids in the auction, which was to close Thursday, had reached $189 late Wednesday.

Scott said he had been thinking about selling his soul for ages.

"I can't see it, touch it or feel it, but I can sell it, so I'm going to palm it off to the highest bidder," he said.

It was in "pretty good nick" except for a rough patch six years ago when he reached the legal drinking age, he said.

Advice from a lawyer was that the winning bidder would not be entitled to anything but Scott's soul and would not be able to own or control him in any way, he said.

The successful bidder will receive a framed deed of "soul ownership," Scott said.

TradeMe business manager Michael O'Donnell said the auction complied with the site's rules because a physical object - the deed of ownership - would change hands.

"I think he has entered into the spirit of the (online) community (and) he's also responded to our request to have a physical thing for sale and he's put together a nice looking deed for ownership," O'Donnell said.

"He's answered the questions in a straightforward manner and with humor and personally. I think it's unlikely that anyone's going to be misled by that auction," he told the Stuff Web site.

In 2001, 20-year-old U.S. university student Adam Burtle tried unsuccessfully to sell his soul on auction Web site eBay.

Bidding had reached $400 before the auction was pulled from the site, with the company ruling something tangible needed to swap hands.

Last month an Australian man sold his entire life including his house and a trial at his job after the break up of his five-year marriage for $383,200.

---

On the Net:

TradeMe Site: http://www.trademe.co.nz

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« Reply #814 on: July 05, 2008, 00:03:13 EDT »

Peeps go suborbital . . .

Quote
Adler launches a Peep with the right fluff

By William Hageman
Tribune reporter

Until now, the greatest contribution that Marshmallow Peeps made to science was to be blown up in microwaves.

And as commendable as that is, that was their only contribution.

But a pioneering Peep has made sweet history by boldly going where no Peep has gone before: into space.

The Adler Planetarium has told the Tribune that a team from its astronomy department launched it (despite his heroics, the poor Peep doesn't have a formal name) and its space birdhouse as part of a science experiment.

Using a weather balloon--and inspired, they say, by Q's Peeps diorama contest last spring--they sent the Peep up from Koerner Aviation in Kankakee on April 5. The helium-filled balloon and our yellow, marshmallowy hero soared nearly 19 miles high before returning to Earth near New Carlisle, Ind., some 85 miles down range.

"The Peep has been introspective since the flight," Geza Gyuk, the Adler's director of astronomy, said of the sugary trailblazer. "And a little shriveled up."

The 10-person Adler crew has been conducting such experiments for a while. The payload on this launch, Mission 12 of the Far Horizons program, was an experiment by two students at Aurora's Illinois Math & Science Academy who wanted to measure how much brighter it is in space.

Astro Peep just hitched a ride.

"On any mission we like to use a video camera to document the flight," said astronomer Mark Hammergren. "And we said, if we have a video camera, and we have a Peep, why not video the Peep?"

"Against the curvature of the Earth," added interactive visualization developer Julieta Aguilera.

Sheer scientific genius.

Of course, you can't just grab any Peep off the shelf and send him skyward.

"We had to choose a Peep who had the right fluff," Hammergren said.

So candidates underwent rigorous psychological and physical training, as demonstrated in a slide show the group put together. The prospective Peeponauts studied the history of space exploration, they were tested in extreme heat and cold, they took a spin on the centrifuge (a.k.a. a ceiling fan). "And we ran a few tests with a vacuum [chamber]," Aguilera added.

"They taste the same," reported Rivka Rosen, another member of the team.

The video of the adventure shows the helmetless Peep, pinned in place on its duct tape-and-Styrofoam birdhouse, as it is freed from its earthly bonds. The $100 video camera records our brave hero as the balloon takes him to 6,700 feet; 57,000 feet; 89,000 feet and beyond. Below, the Earth gets smaller; above, the sky turns from blue to the blackness of space.

"At that altitude, it's 1 percent of the pressure [on the ground], the sky is black, you see the curvature of the Earth," said Gyuk. "It's fantastic. You're 99 percent into space."

Eventually, at around 100,000 feet, the balloon pops. After a few rough moments--the box containing the students' experiment smashes into and nearly flattens the fearless Peep, who soldiers on--the chute opens and the mission is safely completed.

The Adler crew hopes these experiments are a sort of steppingstone. They once dreamed of launching their own high-powered rockets, but common sense intervened.

"There is the problem of working with high explosives," Hammergren said.

"And working with high school kids," Gyuk pointed out.

So they turned to the high-altitude weather balloons, which you can buy, assemble, launch and recover for considerably less than $500.

The next step, they hope, might be to be part of CubeSat, a consortium of universities and other learning centers involved in space. For about $40,000 you can get your payloads sent up on a real rocket.

Until then, though, they'll continue with the balloons, including at a summer student workshop.

"The workshop will feature high-altitude ballooning," Hammergren said. "Maybe not Peeps, but if they can come up with something...."

"Maybe different colors," Aguilera suggested.

"Or maybe hollow chocolate rabbits," Gyuk said. "Maybe Peeps rabbits. Will their ears freeze while the rest expands?"

Science marches on.

The summer student workshop is full, but click here for more of what's going on at the Adler.

bhageman@tribune.com
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« Reply #815 on: July 05, 2008, 19:59:26 EDT »

One small step for Peeps; one giant leap for high-fructose corn syrup.
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« Reply #816 on: July 11, 2008, 11:17:13 EDT »

It's amazing what kinds of things you can find on a trip to the ocean . . .

Quote

2 of 5 feet washed ashore in Canada from same body


By Associated Press

3:43 PM CDT, July 10, 2008

VANCOUVER, British Columbia

Two of the five feet that have washed up on the shores of British Columbia over the past year belonged to the same person, but no identities have been determined in any of the cases, police said Thursday.

A spokeswoman said DNA testing determined that a left foot found in June came from the same male as a right foot found in February. She said police are reviewing missing persons files and have eliminated 130 so far.

Authorities have said they have no reason to believe the cases were related or involved wrongdoing, although they aren't ruling out any possibilities.

"There is no evidence that these feet have been severed. There were no tool marks and no visible signs of trauma," Constable Annie Linteau said at a news conference.

Curtis Ebbesmeyer, an oceanographer, said that when a body decomposes in water, it is not unusual for its parts to separate after prolonged submersion.

The first three feet washed ashore about 40 miles southwest of Vancouver on islands in the Strait of Georgia. The first was discovered last summer by beachcombers. Days later, a foot was found inside a man's Reebok sneaker. The remains of a third foot were found Feb 8.

The fourth foot was found May 22 on Kirkland Island in the Fraser River, about 15 miles south of Vancouver. The fifth -- and the only left foot found -- washed up about a mile away and was discovered June 16.

A sixth find last month turned out to be a hoax, with an animal paw stuffed inside a shoe.

"Until all of those remains have been identified we are going to explore all possibilities," Linteau said.

Dean Hilderbrand, a forensic scientist working on the case, said officials have not yet contacted Swedish police about a similar foot found near Stockholm two days ago.
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« Reply #817 on: July 11, 2008, 11:43:23 EDT »

Interesting... So there are 3 left feet missing, if I followed correctly?
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« Reply #818 on: July 11, 2008, 13:58:40 EDT »

Interesting... So there are 3 left feet missing, if I followed correctly?

Yes, that would be 3 left feet, and four corpses if we're really keeping score.
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« Reply #819 on: July 11, 2008, 14:18:25 EDT »

Interesting... So there are 3 left feet missing, if I followed correctly?

Yes, that would be 3 left feet, and four corpses if we're really keeping score.

Well, if you're nitpicking about it, I guess...
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« Reply #820 on: July 16, 2008, 11:09:30 EDT »

You know times are bad when . . .

Quote
Jul 14, 7:22 PM EDT

Woman accused of smacking beau with toilet seat

FORT PIERCE, Fla. (AP) -- Police arrested a couple after the woman allegedly hit her boyfriend with a toilet seat. The woman, 18, told police that she found her boyfriend smoking cocaine in their bathroom and turned on the shower to try and wash away the drugs.

The pair argued and when he refused to give up the drugs, authorities say the woman hit him with the toilet seat.

The boyfriend was charged with cocaine possession and later released on bond. The woman faces a battery charge and was released without posting bond.


---------------------------------------

Bee: 1, Helicopter: 0

Quote
Jul 14, 7:23 PM EDT

Bee blamed for causing minor helicopter crash

WISCONSIN RAPIDS, Wis. (AP) -- Wood County authorities said an Oklahoma man piloting a crop-dusting helicopter crashed after a bee got sucked into the cockpit and stung him.

Deputy Ted Ashbeck said the chopper was only four feet off the ground, and the pilot was unhurt when the tail rotor smashed into the ground Friday.

Ashbeck said the pilot was spraying a cranberry marsh, where beehives are set up to promote pollination. As the helicopter flew above the hives, at least one bee was sucked inside.

Terry Solf, 65, of Aline, Okla., told investigators the bee stung him, diverting his attention just long enough for him to crash. No one else was aboard.

Solf said he's flown helicopters for more than 30 years.

Ashbeck says the chopper was "pretty banged up."

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« Reply #821 on: July 31, 2008, 15:46:15 EDT »

Bee: 1, Helicopter: 0

Quote
Jul 14, 7:23 PM EDT

Bee blamed for causing minor helicopter crash

WISCONSIN RAPIDS, Wis. (AP) -- Wood County authorities said an Oklahoma man piloting a crop-dusting helicopter crashed after a bee got sucked into the cockpit and stung him.

Deputy Ted Ashbeck said the chopper was only four feet off the ground, and the pilot was unhurt when the tail rotor smashed into the ground Friday.

Ashbeck said the pilot was spraying a cranberry marsh, where beehives are set up to promote pollination. As the helicopter flew above the hives, at least one bee was sucked inside.

Terry Solf, 65, of Aline, Okla., told investigators the bee stung him, diverting his attention just long enough for him to crash. No one else was aboard.

Solf said he's flown helicopters for more than 30 years.

Ashbeck says the chopper was "pretty banged up."


"If the wings are traveling faster than the fuselage, it's probably a helicopter -- and therefore, unsafe." - Unknown
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« Reply #822 on: August 04, 2008, 12:50:57 EDT »

Make sure to check the spellings on those diplomas . . . if you find a "Sanford" or a "Harverd", there might be a problem Tongue

Quote
Bogus diploma ring busted with help from U. of I. professor

Thousands of buyers may have participated in fake diploma scam

By Russell Working | Chicago Tribune reporter
    12:41 AM CDT, August 4, 2008

The network of bogus universities was a family-run venture based in rural Washington state, but the criminal enterprise spanned the globe, with its operators allegedly paying bribes to Liberian officials and selling fake PhDs and MDs as far away as Iran.

They were busted by state and federal officials—among them a Secret Service investigator posing as a shadowy Syrian seeking a bogus chemistry degree—with the help of a local physics professor.

For the last four years, U. of I. at Urbana-Champaign professor and Fermilab physicist George Gollin helped unravel the scheme that has resulted in eight guilty pleas this year and could spark further charges against hundreds of people who may have bought and used bogus diplomas.

Dubbed Operation Gold Seal by federal investigators, the case exploded into the national news last week with the publication of the names of some 9,600 possible buyers of junk degrees from the phony "St. Regis University" and at least 120 affiliated institutions operated by Dixie and Steven Randock Sr.

Claims to advanced degrees from diploma mills and other unaccredited schools are burgeoning, costing taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars a year as state and federal employees use phony credentials to bump up their salaries, Gollin said, citing estimates based on a number of sources, including the Justice Department.

In the Colbert, Wash.-based scam, buyers included people with U.S. government e-mail addresses—such as NASA and the military—and one man who reportedly works in the control room of a nuclear power plant in Wisconsin. At least five people on the list had e-mail addresses indicating they worked for one Chicago-area suburb.

The customers were based in 131 countries, and at least 140 of them reported Illinois addresses, federal investigators stated.

The scheme generated $7.3 million for the owners by selling degrees from phony institutions and unsuspecting real schools, including Chicago Technical College and the University of Illinois at Chicago.

The list of possible buyers, first published in the Spokane Spokesman-Review and also obtained by the Tribune, includes names of people who may have inquired about the degrees but had not actually bought them or used them as an unfair boost in getting promotions, federal officials said. Because of this, the Tribune is not naming the individuals.

In any case, officials are marveling at the strange twists in a scheme worthy of a Graham Greene novel.

"It should be a movie," said Jack Zurlini, an assistant attorney general in Washington state.

"I mean, this one guy went to Liberia to bribe officials. Holy cow! You take your life in your hands to go there in the first place, and you're carrying sacks of money, and you're asking them to do these illegal things. And they did! It's just amazing."

The Liberian Embassy in Washington did not return a reporter's calls and e-mails seeking comment.

Gollin primarily researches technical issues relating to the design and utilization of the International Linear Collider. But he became the unlikely bulldog who latched onto the scam in 2004 when, irritated by the spam from diploma mills clogging his in-box, he began investigating and posting information about St. Regis and other diploma mills on the Web.

The owners had been paying Liberians to accredit them, even though they were located in the U.S., and they didn't take kindly to Gollin's meddling.

"The folks in Spokane, claiming to be Liberian diplomats, wrote to [the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign], threatening to sue me, threatening to sue the university," Gollin said. "The university really freaked about this, and we had a bit of a dust-up."

Officials in Washington began investigating the Randocks' operations when they were alerted that some teachers in Indiana had been claiming the bogus degrees. Zurlini soon learned that Gollin had amassed a great deal of information about the scheme.

"With his help, it became clear to us that it was a criminal enterprise," Zurlini said. "We had this huge data pool out there which is this intricate criminal enterprise, and he was able to make some sense out of it and connect the dots."

Degrees were sold in areas like oncology, dentistry and engineering, and some buyers reportedly worked for state and federal governments, according to the Spokane, Wash., U.S. attorney's office.

That office has distributed the list to federal agencies and state attorneys general around the country so they can decide whether to prosecute anyone.

"There are degrees in areas where you really don't want the practitioner to be incompetent because it would be dangerous," said Gollin, also a board member with the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

It is a crime for federal employees to gain advantage in hiring and promotion by using phony degrees, said Thomas Rice, a senior assistant U.S. attorney in Spokane, whose office prosecuted the case.

In the St. Regis case, degrees may have been sold to people with e-mail addresses from NASA, the military, the Social Security Administration and the National Endowment for the Humanities, according to the list. All might potentially face federal charges, Rice said.

In one case, "We had to recuse ourselves because a deputy United States marshal obtained a degree and allegedly attempted to use it to get a promotion in this district, and he was prosecuted for that in this district," he said.

Gollin said that when he began, he had no idea how far the case would go.

"I was just trying to make information available so that someone would be able to tell that something like St. Regis was not a real school," he said. "And that they shouldn't go to a physician who bought one of the MDs at St. Regis."

rworking@tribune.com
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« Reply #823 on: August 08, 2008, 15:12:35 EDT »

File this one under "Future Criminal Masterminds"

Quote
Cops follow Cheetos trail to nail burglar suspects

Thu Aug 7, 7:54 PM ET

ST. PAUL - St. Paul police followed a trail of Cheetos in order to nab three teenagers suspected of burglarizing a vending machine. Officers were called to the Arlington Recreation Center on July 29, where they found a vending machine's glass had been broken with a chair.

Most of the candy and chips were missing, according to a criminal complaint in Ramsey County District Court.

The officers followed the orange, dusty trail from the rec center, around the side of the building and to a nearby home. Inside, they found numerous vending-sized bags of Cheetos and other snacks.

Police arrested three males aged 17, 18 and 19 who soon arrived at the home by car. The two adults are charged with third-degree burglary, while the 17-year-old is charged with criminal damage to property.

All three denied being involved, the complaint says.

___

Information from: St. Paul Pioneer Press, http://www.twincities.com

-----------------------------------------------------------

Wait, there's a problem with that?

Quote
Grandma arrested for driving with child on roof

Thu Aug 7, 7:54 PM ET

MARATHON, Fla. - Authorities say a grandmother was arrested for driving around the parking lot of a Marathon grocery store with her 3-year-old child sitting on the roof of the car.

Monroe County Sheriff's Office deputies were called to the Publix store Tuesday and arrested a 54-year-old woman after she was driving around with her three-year-old granddaughter on the roof of her car.

The grandmother was released from jail 15 hours later.

The woman said Thursday she would never let anything hurt her granddaughter. She says she was driving at "snail-speed" and holding the child's leg.

Authorities say the woman told police she was giving the child some air and letting her have fun.

She faces charges of child abuse. The child is back with her mother.
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« Reply #824 on: August 11, 2008, 12:57:30 EDT »

The eternal question once again raises its ugly head . . .

Quote
Chicken crosses the road, then abandoned by thief

Fri Aug 8, 9:18 PM ET

KENNEWICK, Wash. - Why did the chicken cross the road? In the case of Jerry Sleater's 5-foot, 400-pound bright blue rooster, that's apparently as far as whoever was trying to steal it could get it.

When the 76-year-old Eastern Washington man went to get his newspaper Thursday morning, the big bird named Rudy was lying beside the road.

Sleater has kept the metal rooster perched on his property south of Kennewick for two years and says, "Rudy is a family pet. He doesn't go anywhere, but he's part of the family."

Sleater said he thinks that whoever was trying to steal Rudy got spooked after pushing the oversized rooster down a dirt embankment.

He said he purchased Rudy two years ago from a yard ornament store that was going out of business.

___

Information from: Tri-City Herald, http://www.tri-cityherald.com

-----------------------------------------------------------

Well, he could have had a cheesecake in the box!

Quote
Man accused of trying to rob store with empty box

Fri Aug 8, 5:13 PM ET

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Charleston police said a man tried to rob a movie rental store with an unusual weapon — an empty cheesecake box. Earlier this week, the suspect placed the box on the counter of the Movie Gallery with a note saying it contained a bomb. He told the clerk the bomb would be detonated remotely if he wasn't given cash.

The clerk refused and the suspect fled.

Police arrested 43-year-old Paul Parrish II of Charleston on Wednesday.

Sgt. Aaron James said Parrish allegedly confessed after he was shown a store video of the attempted robbery. Parrish allegedly told police he needed money for gas and cigarettes.

Parrish is charged with first-degree robbery. He's being held at South Central Regional Jail and doesn't yet have an attorney.

___

Information from: The Charleston Gazette, http://www.wvgazette.com
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