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Obama jokes
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Author Topic: Obama jokes  (Read 10664 times)
purplecat
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« Reply #30 on: November 29, 2008, 08:03:14 EST »

Also, he wrote the rough draft of the declaration, the revised version is for the most part much better.  In particular, he put pursuit of property, not pursuit of happiness.

It doesn't seem to have done much good, given how many people assume that it's still in there.

It's a bit like any text. Some people are all for following the exact wording, except when the exact wording doesn't say what they want.
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« Reply #31 on: November 29, 2008, 11:20:53 EST »

Ah, but you learned something much, much more important then the details of american history, you learned that all people can be distracted by a nice pair of legs (or whatever body part they like).

For some reason many historians have trouble applying this concept, so you can consider yourself better at history then many historians.
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« Reply #32 on: November 29, 2008, 13:05:20 EST »

Ah, but you learned something much, much more important then the details of american history, you learned that all people can be distracted by a nice pair of legs (or whatever body part they like).

For some reason many historians have trouble applying this concept, so you can consider yourself better at history then many historians.

I also had a lot more fun.
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« Reply #33 on: December 01, 2008, 06:26:54 EST »

Also, he wrote the rough draft of the declaration, the revised version is for the most part much better.  In particular, he put pursuit of property, not pursuit of happiness.
That idea is taken directly from John Locke.  Locke said "no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions".  Almost the same sentence exists in the Virginia declaration of Rights and the Declaration of Colonial Rights.

As far as I know, it isn't really clear who made changes folks refer to.  Many historians think that Jefferson himself added the phrase "the pursuit of happiness", many also think that he changed "sacred" to "self-evident".

In my view he should have put in both property and happiness.
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« Reply #34 on: December 01, 2008, 18:54:59 EST »


As far as I know, it isn't really clear who made changes folks refer to.  Many historians think that Jefferson himself added the phrase "the pursuit of happiness", many also think that he changed "sacred" to "self-evident".

I've heard Franklin changed sacred to self-evident.

He was such a baller. It's all about the Benjamins.
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« Reply #35 on: December 02, 2008, 07:49:43 EST »


As far as I know, it isn't really clear who made changes folks refer to.  Many historians think that Jefferson himself added the phrase "the pursuit of happiness", many also think that he changed "sacred" to "self-evident".

I've heard Franklin changed sacred to self-evident.

He was such a baller. It's all about the Benjamins.
Poke around the internet a bit and you'll find that it's still an open issue.
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« Reply #36 on: December 02, 2008, 18:30:50 EST »


As far as I know, it isn't really clear who made changes folks refer to.  Many historians think that Jefferson himself added the phrase "the pursuit of happiness", many also think that he changed "sacred" to "self-evident".

I've heard Franklin changed sacred to self-evident.

He was such a baller. It's all about the Benjamins.
Poke around the internet a bit and you'll find that it's still an open issue.


I trust you on this.
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« Reply #37 on: December 03, 2008, 07:56:09 EST »

Quote from: Wodan46
The historian said that if Mr.  Obama insists on using complete sentences in his speeches, the public may find itself saying, "Okay, subject, predicate, subject predicate - we get it, stop showing off."  The President-elect's stubborn insistence on using complete  sentences has already attracted a rebuke from one of his harshest critics, Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska.  "Talking with complete sentences there and also too talking in a way that ordinary Americans like Joe the Plumber and Tito the Builder can't really do
there, I think needing to do that isn't tapping  into what Americans are needing also," she said.
This is amazing.  It appears that linguists have being studying Sarah Palin carefully.  And I thought I was a nerd.

Quote
But the main themes of the verbal caricature are various morphosyntactic features that have been prominent in our extensive Sarah Palin coverage here at Language Log: g-dropping ("Palin's tactical g-lessness", "Empathetic -in'"), demonstratives ("Affective demonstratives", "Affective demonstratives for everyone"), and clause-final also ("Also outside").
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