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Bloggers disturbing the British government
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Author Topic: Bloggers disturbing the British government  (Read 3932 times)
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« on: November 07, 2008, 12:15:46 EST »

An amusing little story from Britain....

A government minister Hazel Blears gave a bad-tempered speech about how bloggers are a threat to democracy because they expose failings in the government.  Particularly the blogger Guido Fawkes.

There is this idea in the US that bloggers wear red capes and blog from high-altitude balloons.  Well, when you call yourself Guido Fawkes the costume has to be a little bit more sinister, a bit more V-for-Vendetta.  Having being tipped off about the speech Guido and some of his fans went around to listen to it dressed appropriately.  And they got arrested.

What I can't understand is why should the government wait until November 5th to have a go at bloggers?

If bloggers can cause this much trouble there is obviously still hope....

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purplecat
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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2008, 14:22:50 EST »

Oh dear. It's clear that nobody in government ever gives a thought to the cultural baggage of their actions.

Given what else she's been saying lately, it's clear that Blears is completely disconnecting from reality.

That said, Guido is a complete hack.
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The Dude
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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2008, 22:39:09 EST »

Dressing like a terrorist, on the anniversary of his attempted attack, and attending a political event, is fishy enough for police to take notice, in my mind.
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« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2008, 12:36:50 EST »

I don't think we give terrorists enough respect.  They are deeply noble people willing to kill and die to change the world, and there is something of worth in that.
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« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2008, 13:36:31 EST »

I don't think we give terrorists enough respect.  They are deeply noble people willing to kill and die to change the world, and there is something of worth in that.

umm no. Agains it about who they are willing to kill. And their relation with the problem
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« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2008, 14:09:50 EST »

I'm not so hot on the specialness of all human life, so murder of common trash is less a concern for me.

Of course, I wouldn't suggest founding a government on existential idealogies.
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joshbrenton
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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2008, 15:23:33 EST »

I don't think we give terrorists enough respect.  They are deeply noble people willing to kill and die to change the world, and there is something of worth in that.

I'd advise you not to say that to anyone who lost a loved one in a terrorist attack, or there is a strong risk you may end up with some broken bones.

Having dispensed with some advice, I gotta say that such a statement sickens me. That's like saying we should give rapists and pedophiles respect because they're rebelling against sexual mores that they consider oppressive.
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The Dude
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« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2008, 17:00:47 EST »

I'd advise you not to say that to anyone who lost a loved one in a terrorist attack, or there is a strong risk you may end up with some broken bones.

Having dispensed with some advice, I gotta say that such a statement sickens me. That's like saying we should give rapists and pedophiles respect because they're rebelling against sexual mores that they consider oppressive.

That's silly.  It's more like suggesting that soldiers can't be noble or brave to someone who has lost relatives in a war.

I think people just assume terrorists have goals they don't agree with.

There were people in 19th Century America killing anti-abolitionists... and not with guns, with a freakin' axe.  John Brown was a whack-job committing crimes, but against the larger crime of slavery, well... let's just say it's harder to condemn him.

It's like the Civil War.  I personally think it was avoidable, and that peaceful abolition was possible.  But I'm not going to look a black man in the eye and tell him I think his race should have been subjugated for another generation for my convenience.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2008, 17:03:00 EST by The Dude » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2008, 13:21:24 EST »

Josh, I don't find myself swayed by the emotional argument of "try telling that to so and so", I have in fact done so, and yes people have taken swings at me before.  Thankfully most of the people you're talking about are americans, and lucky for me americans can't fight worth a damn.

Of course, I find it kind of amusing, because these were the same people who feted the IRA not a few years before.  I'm not a supporter of the IRA directly because I don't think it advances the goals of Ireland, but I respect them and accept that without terrorist actions the British empire might never have collapsed.  It seems stupid to say "our terrorists are good, and your terrorists are bad" merely because we can put a nice sheen on the history of the conflicts.

Nowadays d'ya know who we'd compare Washington to?  Muqtada Al-Sadr.  It strikes my irony bone deep that the very things which ushered in America's era of rise are ushering in America's era of decline.
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« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2008, 04:50:17 EST »

That said, Guido is a complete hack.
Yes.  But he achieves things from time to time.

Dressing like a terrorist, on the anniversary of his attempted attack, and attending a political event, is fishy enough for police to take notice, in my mind.
Well, dressing like Guy Fawkes on November 5th is not really so odd.  They didn't actually get arrested at the event, they got arrested in the street near parliament.  It turns out that the event where Hazel Blears was bemoaning the lack of connection between the electorate and politicians was actually closed to the public and could only be attended by the press.
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