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The 40th Election
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Author Topic: The 40th Election  (Read 7662 times)
Medivh
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« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2008, 10:19:20 EDT »

Odd... there's a damned near permanent coalition in Australia, between the Liberal party and the National party, even when the coalition combined is still a minority against the Labor party.

There was talk of it breaking up, not too long ago, but I think that was just the National party agitating for more power.
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And if i catch you comin' back my way
I'm gonna serve it to you
And that ain't what you want to hear
But that's what I'll do
-- "Seven Nation Army", The White Stripes

So what you're telling me is that LTV's fudge factor means more than it's independent variable?
Yes...
Jeremy
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« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2008, 10:56:53 EDT »

Minor nitpick:
Most models based on the British model, the party with the most seats
is given first chance to form a government. This may or may not lead to
a coalition.

Actually, the incumbent party is given the first chance to form the government. For example, after the 1925 election, the Conservatives under Arthur Meighen held 115 seats, the Liberals under W.L. Mackenzie King held 100 seats, the Progressives under Robert Forke held 22 seats, and the Labour Party under J.S. Woodsworth held 2 seats, with the other 6 seats held by independents and the United Farmers of Alberta. King, the incumbent, was first asked if he could maintain confidence in Parliament. King was able to form an informal coalition with Forke and Woodsworth and so had 124 seats to Meighen's 115. Thus, Mackenzie King held on to power.
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purplecat
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« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2008, 12:48:05 EDT »

Odd... there's a damned near permanent coalition in Australia, between the Liberal party and the National party, even when the coalition combined is still a minority against the Labor party.

There was talk of it breaking up, not too long ago, but I think that was just the National party agitating for more power.

that's a political alliance, rather than a coalition government. (Local terms may vary).
IANAC, but as far as I know, the "liberal" and national parties don't stand against each other and may be counted as one big party on a national level, much like the CDU/CSU in Germany.
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Purplecat: Keeper of the political compass thread. Want to be on the graph? post your results here

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Schmorgluck
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« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2008, 19:00:07 EDT »

Well, CDU/CSU is a bit of a particular case, CSU being barely more than a local (Bavarian) variant of CDU.
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thomasdean
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« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2008, 20:42:55 EDT »

Minor nitpick:
Most models based on the British model, the party with the most seats
is given first chance to form a government. This may or may not lead to
a coalition.

Actually, the incumbent party is given the first chance to form the government. For example, after the 1925 election, the Conservatives under Arthur Meighen held 115 seats, the Liberals under W.L. Mackenzie King held 100 seats, the Progressives under Robert Forke held 22 seats, and the Labour Party under J.S. Woodsworth held 2 seats, with the other 6 seats held by independents and the United Farmers of Alberta. King, the incumbent, was first asked if he could maintain confidence in Parliament. King was able to form an informal coalition with Forke and Woodsworth and so had 124 seats to Meighen's 115. Thus, Mackenzie King held on to power.
I stand corrected.
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Economic Left/Right: -7.13
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -5.85
Erdos Number: 4
Quote from: JKR
Ce sont nos choix qui montrent ce que nous sommes vraiment,
beaucoup plus que nos aptitudes.
Medivh
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« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2008, 22:29:29 EDT »

Odd... there's a damned near permanent coalition in Australia, between the Liberal party and the National party, even when the coalition combined is still a minority against the Labor party.

There was talk of it breaking up, not too long ago, but I think that was just the National party agitating for more power.

that's a political alliance, rather than a coalition government. (Local terms may vary).
IANAC, but as far as I know, the "liberal" and national parties don't stand against each other and may be counted as one big party on a national level, much like the CDU/CSU in Germany.

That's pretty much the scenario, but they call themselves "the coalition". Liberal candidates stand against National candidates once and the winner takes the nomination for candidate of the seat until that person retires. It's not as damaging as you might think, because of IRV. The candidate that gets eliminated first sends most of his voters to the other party's candidate.

Typically the Liberals represent the conservatives in the cities, the Nationals represent the conservatives in the country. Even given the higher prevalence of conservatives in the country, the Nationals only get about 25% of the seats that the Liberals get.

Yes, the Liberals being conservative confuses everyone. Australians typically think in terms of left- and right-wing. Apparently the name refers to their economic liberalism, as they were formed at a time where the parties were two different varieties of economic conservatives.
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And if i catch you comin' back my way
I'm gonna serve it to you
And that ain't what you want to hear
But that's what I'll do
-- "Seven Nation Army", The White Stripes

So what you're telling me is that LTV's fudge factor means more than it's independent variable?
Yes...
boring7
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« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2008, 18:54:07 EDT »

All I learned about Canadian government I learned from watching This Hour Has 22 minutes. 
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Heq
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« Reply #22 on: October 19, 2008, 11:41:38 EDT »

That show is a lot more about newfoundland politics then Canadian.  Politics of personality dominate that landscape, whereas in upper Canada there is a lot more American-style politics of parties.
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"No common man could believe such a thing, you'd have to be an intellectual to fall for anything as stupid as that."-Orwell
Jeremy
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« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2008, 20:26:39 EDT »

Liberal wins against Bloc in recount in Brossard - La Prairie.
In Quebec:
Bloc 49
Liberal 14
Conservative 10
NDP 1
Ind 1
TOTAL 75

In Canada:
Conservative 143
Liberal 77
Bloc 49
NDP 37
Ind 2
TOTAL 308

Conservative victory confirmed in recount in Egmont. Recounts pending in Brampton West, Kitchener - Waterloo, Vancouver South, and Esquimault - Juan de Fuca.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2008, 20:29:15 EDT by Jeremy » Logged
Heq
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« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2008, 22:03:40 EDT »

If we can't shore up the maritimes (especially if we get a leader like Iggy or Rae) the whole coast may well go blue next election.

Truth to be told, unless we get new blood and some speakers who can make a case, we're going to get the bejesus kicked out of us next go 'round too.
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"No common man could believe such a thing, you'd have to be an intellectual to fall for anything as stupid as that."-Orwell
Jeremy
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« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2008, 11:54:40 EDT »

The Liberla have hung on to Vancouver South by 22 votes. That's closer than the closest race in 2006 (Parry Sound - Muskoka, 24 votes).
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Heq
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« Reply #26 on: October 28, 2008, 17:00:55 EDT »

That's on us.

We did a piss-poor job running the province, and people are cheesed.  Politicans like to divide the landscape, but if you stank it up with one version of your brand, there is bleed-over.
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"No common man could believe such a thing, you'd have to be an intellectual to fall for anything as stupid as that."-Orwell
Jeremy
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« Reply #27 on: October 30, 2008, 11:46:34 EDT »

Recount in Esquimault - Juan de Fuca terminated.
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Medivh
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« Reply #28 on: October 30, 2008, 19:45:30 EDT »

That sounds rather draconian... Tongue
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And if i catch you comin' back my way
I'm gonna serve it to you
And that ain't what you want to hear
But that's what I'll do
-- "Seven Nation Army", The White Stripes

So what you're telling me is that LTV's fudge factor means more than it's independent variable?
Yes...
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